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an effective curriculum to prepare us for life? teach us about politics? [inaudible] education and [inaudible] which can be achieved in a year? or do you want to drag out the campaign making public transport cheaper, better, and assessable for all? for at least another year? it's your decision. [applause] >> thank you very much indeed. we have two great speeches to get us to a cracking start. and i'm not looking for contributions from the floor, yes. the first person i saw was the young woman there. [inaudible conversations] >> yes. start by saying name and area. >> from north york shire. as we're awear and public transport is a big issue [inaudible] and again this is debate. i'm from north york shire we run the -- [inaudible] this summer which allows young people to travel on buses for one pound for a whole day. the scheme was a great achievement it was only one county wide and by the north -- [inaudible] council therefore we came across many barriers for a staff not all of us complete -- [inaudible] and when they did it was often on their own term. in addition it was very hard for us to pro
1981 to 1982 he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals and in the district of columbia circuit in 1990. president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 23, 1991. ladies and gentlemen please welcome justice thomas and professor amar to the stage. [applause] [applause] >> the thank you ladies and gentlemen for that extraordinarily gracious ,-com,-com ma warm welcome. thank you to the national archives and to the staff for making this event possible and thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitution accountability center and thank you justice thomas for being with us today as we marked the 225th earth day, 225th anniversary of our constitution. i guess i would like to start our conversation with the words of the constitution, we the people, and what that phrase means to you and how that phrase baby has changed over time thanks to amendments a
. michele obama loves being first lady. she is a very intelligent, well-educated, well spoken woman with strong opinion but who also has a reputation for liking the very comfortable lifestyle land in the white house she has people taking care of her everyone to and which. she has gone on many vacations, some of them quite controversial, the ski slopes in the west of the united states and at one point during a period of several months, she is living the life of a pampered women and this fits with her personality. >> host: where the clintons were open about their coat presidency boasting that hillary was an equal partner with bill lee obamas have been careful to hide the fact that michelle was the president's most important political adviser and the one he listens to above all others before he makes major decisions. >> guest: that is so true. of the way she does that is often for her very best friend, how she gets her opinions. her very best friend, valerie jarrett, is a woman who hired michele many many years ago to work with her in a daily's administration in chicago but more import
and stewart taylor on their book about affirmative action in higher education. and at 11:50, jeffrey toobin on how the makeup of the court has changed in the last decade and how that's affected its rulings. >> the issue's not whether help is going to be stigmatized or morally condemned. he is for pro icily these same -- precisely these same false claims. the issue is how many times the court can punish him, and the answer in the double jeopardy clause is once. >> starting monday and throughout christmas week c-span radio is featuring supreme court oral arguments by current justices before they were on the bench.
dumbs. they talk about the economy, jobs, the climate, education and things that matter and they don't use the kind of language that we use in our campaign because they're scared or turn off the voters in the middle. at the center that since we don't like mandatory anything now come to be a champion of the mega millions lottery where your ticket is your voting stock of coming and if you look at the last mega millions where people camped out three days in advance to be given to get a ticket where of course let's face it the chance of winning was less than being struck by lightning twice in a day put a few hundred million dollars into this and we will up their turnout significantly. i think they are an easier way to move in a direction and a lot of things can be done. we have to do some changes in the system including the filibuster. >> can i add a word? >> i fifa to questions go to get their. how to make it better and isn't it the public's fault after dhaka? i think they fit very well together. if you have a mismatch, if you have ideologically polarized parties operating in a separati
people. some of them who have formal education, some who did not. they cared about the country. i think you need to have that today. i think that, you know, i go back to your book, you talk about the written and unwritten constitution. the unwritten constitution is that sort of trying to bring to apply it to current events and problems and cases, and developments and the debate continues on each one of those. and that's why you see the court go different ways. that's why the arguments -- [inaudible] that's why the scholarship is so important. one thing i like about the tone of the book. it's so positive. it's refreshing. you know, it's not i have all the answers. here is some answers. let's talk about it. it isn't up here. i told my clerks, when we work on opinions, you have to explain -- take your parents, they rim gaunteds, they are -- immigrants they are bright people. i don't think they are doctors or lawyers. it's their constitution too. and we should explain it and get in a they interpreted in a way to make it s&l to them. -- assessable to them. that's what i think you're trying t
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6